Food for thought‘[...] do not think that good design can make a poor product good, whether the product be a machine, a building, a promotional brochure or a business man. But [...] good design can materially help make a good product reach its full potential. In short, [...] good design is good business.’
Thomas J. Watson Jr., IBM CEO

Get your own Periodic Table of Typefaces

October 9, 2009, 1:33 PM

Remember the Periodic Table of Typefaces? Well, you can print your own now—thanks to the high demand, the kind folks at Squidspot can send you the vector files—donating is of course encouraged. I surely got mine already—I couldn’t consider myself a type-fan without having this on my wall :P

You can also buy the new versions, printed silver on black or white:
typeface_poster_blk_slv

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Wonderful type spreads—CABE's 10th anniversary

, 11:24 AM

You can read the whole post on Johnson Banks’ blog, but here are the goodies:

490_divider_1_400

490_divider_2_400

490_divider_3_400

490_divider_5_400

490_cover_400

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Michael Anderson—coolest CV you’ve ever seen

October 7, 2009, 12:34 PM

This guy surely got the attention. You can read about it on his blog, theportfolio.ofmichaelanderson.com (direct link).

Coolest CV — click on the image for a larger size.

(via dump.com, thanks Andreea)

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"Browse less & draw more"

October 3, 2009, 7:42 PM

This is probably the best piece of advice I could ever give to a fellow designer. And I’m very very sure Mr. Milton Glaser would agree, as you can read in this interview, with Chip Kidd.

I made an iPhone wallpaper out of it, to keep it in mind as much as possible—maybe, just maybe I’ll be able to actually take this advice myself. Feel free to use it. Let me know if you like it. Thanks :)

Browse less & draw more

Browse less & draw more

And yes, nothing beats Futura. Ever.
(small hint to IKEA :P)

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Kit Hinrichs leaves Pentagram

, 3:30 PM

1_Hinrichs_portrait

After Robert Brunner left Pentagram’s San Francisco office to start his own firm, Ammunition, this time is Kit Hinrichs‘ turn. You can read the press release here, on @Issue (where Kit Hinrichs is the Design Director). Kit’s profile on Pentagram Partners has already been taken down.

Pentagram in 1986

Pentagram in 1986

While Robert Brunner’s departure seemed to make a little more sense, as his studio seems to be focused more on industrial design than on communication and corporate design, Kit’s departure is not so clear. The press release doesn’t give any hints, and, as always in such cases, nobody involved will—we can only speculate what could possibly make you leave one of the most acclaimed (if not the most) companies in the world—and after 24 years, mind you. Has this been triggered by the recession? Is it a personal dispute? Is Mr. Colin Forbes‘ business model not working so well anymore? Or is it just the right time for a change for Mr. Hinrichs? We’ll never know for sure.

One thing I know, it makes me feel sad to learn about Mr. Kit’s departure—I don’t know why, maybe because Pentagram loses one of its own—but I also feel glad for him. I know very well how good it feels to try something new, especially after such a long time. It feels like being born again. Good luck to Mr. Hinrichs.

(second photo taken from Pentagram: The Compendium)

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“It’s good to feel uncomfortable.”

October 1, 2009, 12:17 AM

Another thoughtful article from Dave Trott:

[…] we need to study ourselves.

To find out what side of the brain we are dominant in.

(Left brain being the rational side, right brain being the emotional.)

Then we need to spend as much time as we can exposing ourself to influences from the other side.

Because whatever side is dominant is our comfort zone.

We’ll naturally gravitate to that.

But anything we learn in our comfort zone won’t give us any new combinations.

Whereas whatever we learn on the other side of the brain gives us a completely new set of possible links to our existing side.

So we should force ourselves to experience whatever we’re not comfortable with.

If you’re a numeric person, force yourself to experience art and music.

If you’re a visual person, force yourself to read more books.

If you like fiction, make yourself to read non-fiction.

If you like rock music make yourself listen to Classic FM.

Explore.

While we’re in our comfort zone we’re on auto pilot.

We’re relaxing and letting it wash over us.

But when we move out of our comfort zone our mind is forced to think.

Forced to try to find something good in what we don’t like.

Staying in our comfort zone just means staying with what we already know.

There’s no growth there.

No possibilities for new combinations.

Paul Arden used to say, “It’s good to feel uncomfortable.”

We shouldn’t be frightened to feel uncomfortable.

We don’t need to live in either of the two big comfortable, predictable circles.

Thanks again Sebi for the tip ;)

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Type treat for the five senses

September 11, 2009, 11:36 AM

Superb typography for Typophile Film Fest 5:
Handcrafted with love by Brigham Young University (BYU) design students and faculty, for Typophile Film Fest 5. A visual typographic feast about the five senses, and how they contribute to and enhance our creativity. Everything in the film is real—no computer generated (CG) effects!

Typophile Film Festival 5 Opening Titles from Brent Barson on Vimeo.

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IKEA + Verdana — follow up

August 26, 2009, 10:50 AM

Post merged with the original one, for consistency reasons :) Read and comment here. Thank you.

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